• Interrogating Stanley Hauerwas

    INVITE webStanley Hauerwas is arguably the most influential moral theologian of the last generation. On Saturday 30th June, he appears at an event in All Hallow's Campus, DCU with fellow theologian Brian Brock to discuss the book 'Beginnings: Interrogating Hauerwas' which is edited by the JCFJ's Kevin Hargaden.

    In a series of audio posts, Kevin Hargaden explains who Stanley Hargaden is and why we should be interested in this 'outspoken pacifist'. The book's co-author Brian Brock is a collaborator and friend of Hauerwas who is also introduced to us here

    The book 'Beginnings: Interrogating Hauerwas' is important on at least two levels. As an academic guide it provides an introduction to reading Hauerwas's work over the past four decades. It also tackles the contentious issues within it like medical ethics, peacemaking and virtue theory. The book lives up to its original title 'Hard Questions'. 

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  • Stop Ignoring Chronic Prison Problems

    Stop ignoring the chronic problems in our prisonsThe Irish Prison Service and the Minister for Justice and Equality must stop ignoring chronic problems in our prisons including  overcrowding, restricted regimes and a lack of provision for young adults.
     

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  • Working Notes Issue 82

    working notes webWorking Notes has a brand new look! In Issue 82, we look back on the ten years since the crash.

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  • Policy and Research Internship

    Intern wantedThe Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice (JCFJ) is inviting applications for the position of Policy and Research Intern. The ideal candidate will have a passion for social justice issues, e.g. the rights and needs of people in prison, a desire to solve homelessness or stop climate change, be a self-starter and have excellent organisational skills.

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About the Centre

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice works to combat injustice and marginalisation in Irish society, through social analysis, education and advocacy.

The Centre highlights complex social issues, informs opinion and advocates for governmental policy change to create a fair and equitable society for all.

Analysis on our Key Issues

People in prison are amongst the most marginalised and vulnerable in our society. The majority have left school early, experience literacy and learning difficulties and have a history of unemployment... Click here to view all of our material on Penal Policy

Environmental protection has emerged as a key element of social justice debates in recent decades... Click here to view all of our material on Environmental Justice

The right to a safe and secure place to live is one of the most basic human rights, it is fundamental to enable people to live a dignified life... Click here to view all of our material on Housing Policy

In our political discourse, every question of human flourishing seems to be reduced to bottom-line thinking. This focus on riches impoverishes our shared discourse and has serious negative consequences for society Click here to view material on Economic Justice

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice focuses on a number of other issues... Explore all here

Our Journal

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Exploring Social Justice

Why Care - Social Justice Awareness for Younger People

Interrogating Stanley Hauerwas

INVITE webStanley Hauerwas is arguably the most influential moral theologian of the last generation. On Saturday 30th June, he appears at an event in All Hallow's Campus, DCU with fellow theologian Brian Brock to discuss the book 'Beginnings: Interrogating Hauerwas' which is edited by the JCFJ's Kevin Hargaden.

In a series of audio posts, Kevin Hargaden explains who Stanley Hargaden is and why we should be interested in this 'outspoken pacifist'. The book's co-author Brian Brock is a collaborator and friend of Hauerwas who is also introduced to us here

The book 'Beginnings: Interrogating Hauerwas' is important on at least two levels. As an academic guide it provides an introduction to reading Hauerwas's work over the past four decades. It also tackles the contentious issues within it like medical ethics, peacemaking and virtue theory. The book lives up to its original title 'Hard Questions'. 

Posted in Poverty & Inequality News

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Policy and Research Internship

Intern wantedThe Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice (JCFJ) is inviting applications for the position of Policy and Research Intern. The ideal candidate will have a passion for social justice issues, e.g. the rights and needs of people in prison, a desire to solve homelessness or stop climate change, be a self-starter and have excellent organisational skills.

Posted in Poverty & Inequality News

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Working Notes Issue 75: Inequality Matters

Working Notes Issue 75Working Notes Issue 75: Inequality Matters

There has been an increased focus on inequality in the last few years, from sources as diverse as the Occupy movement and the OECD. The slogan of the former, ‘We are the 99%’, reflects the extreme concentration of wealth and incomes in the top 1% of the population in developed countries.

While the OECD has identified that ‘Income inequality in OECD countries is at its highest level for the past half century. The average income of the richest 10% of the population is about nine times that of the poorest 10% across the OECD, up from seven times 25 years ago’.

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Peter McVerry SJ's opinion series for the Irish Times

mcverry 400x307Power and Privilege go hand in hand, Peter McVerry SJ writing in the Irish Times

Peter McVerry SJ, as a part of a five part series, in The Irish Times entitled 'Power and privilege: how the wealthy, church and global capitalism hold sway'.

In it he argues that "To try to understand poverty, the poor have been analysed to death. Volumes have been written on their backgrounds, education and every minute detail of their lives. But to understand poverty, we have to analyse wealth."

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Back to School: Why Care about Social Justice?

whycareIt’s nearly back to school time so why not check out our website on social issues called whycare.ie. Designed for both students and teachers it is an online educational resource on social justice issues in Ireland such as crime, homelessness and prison. The website provides useful information and challenging questions to encourage informed debate among young people by developing their understanding of concepts such as human rights, inequality, poverty, and the complex relationship these have with phenomena such as crime and homelessness.

Why Care? aims to promote complex social issues in a practical – rather than an abstract – way, by encouraging students to act for social justice. It highlights how each of us can act within our community or school for the promotion of social justice, and that a person does not have to be famous or extraordinary to make a difference.

The resource is broken down into four parts. The first discusses the concepts of social justice, human rights and inequality in general, on both a national and international scale. The following two sections – ‘Homelessness and Housing’ and ‘Understanding Crime’ develops students understanding of how these two issues relate to social justice, and their complex interrelationship with each other. The final section ‘Working for Justice’ gives examples of local people working for justice, and organisations in Ireland that address the issues covered in the site. There is also a ‘Teacher’s Section’, accessed with a username and password, that gives additional resources including an educators guide and class activities that relate to the various issues. For access to the Teacher’s Section, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Working Notes, April 2013: Waiting for Asylum Decisions

Working Notes Issue 71: Waiting for Asylum DecisionsThis issue of Working Notes is made up of four articles which cover a range of subjects from the Direct Provision system and racism in Ireland, to a theological discussion of the economic crisis.
 
Eugene Quinn, Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) in Ireland examines the problems within the asylum seeking process in Ireland – with specific reference to the direct provision accommodation system. He highlights the loss of morale that can occur due to the average length of the process (three and a half years), and the ban on asylum seekers taking up employment.

Catherine Lynch discusses the issue of racism in Ireland, and states that surveys and the experience of NGOs find greater incidences of racism than those officially recorded by An Garda Síochána.

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