Launching Re-imagining Imprisonment: Effects, Failures and the Future

Re-imagining Imprisonment: Effects, Failures and the Future

Thursday 5th June 2014 at 6:30 pm
(reception) for 7:00 pm start.
Venue: City Hall, Dame St, Dublin 2.

RSVP to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 3rd June 2014

Click here for full details

Countries throughout Europe are sending more and more of their citizens to prison, yet this has no correlation with crime figures. Alongside this, people are being sent to prison for longer.

This book stems from the Scribani international conference organised by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice which was held in Trinity College Dublin. The chapters analyse some of the key features of imprisonment throughout Europe today, including the political, social and economic forces shaping prison policy and practice. Authors explore how people in prison are treated and portrayed and what future imprisonment should look like in terms of policy, population size, prison conditions and most importantly, its use.

A unique publication, this book brings together contributors from different parts of Europe who work in different capacities in and around national penal systems: prison and probation officers, prisoner rights advocates, teachers, academics and others. A number of chapters act as conduits for the voices and opinions of people in prison. What binds together the variety of authors in this book is an immense desire to re-imagine how we respond to people who fall foul of the law, recognising them as fellow members of our society, and responding more constructively and with greater humanity.

Posted in Criminality, Prisons and Justice News

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Overcrowding and cell sharing continues despite latest report into 2006 death

dsc00081 250x250Last week the Department of Justice published its report Commission of Investigation into the Death of Gary Douch. The report concludes that ‘Overcrowding in Mountjoy Prison completely undermined the ability of the prison to respond in a meaningful and safe way to Gary Douch’s request for protection’, and furthermore that ‘keeping seven prisoners overnight in Holding Cell 2 of the B Base was a violation of each of those prisoners’ human rights.’ This report comes seven years after Gary Douch was put in a holding cell with six other men overnight after asking to be placed in protection for fear of his life. One of these men was Stephen Egan who had just transferred from Cloverhill Prison, and before that the Central Mental Hospital, without a proper mental health evaluation or care. During the night, Egan beat Douch to death and hid his body under one of the mattresses on the floor of the cell. For the full report click here. For summary and analysis read Cormac O'Keeffe's article from the Irish Examiner.

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Serious Concerns omitted in Limerick Prison Visiting Committee Report

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE

18h00

Wednesday, 5 March 2014


The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice has expressed concern that the Visiting Committee Report on Limerick Prison misses the big picture.

Eoin Carroll, Advocacy Officer in the Jesuit Centre said, “The Committee’s report highlights that there has been an improvement in reducing overcrowding. It fails, however, to mention that both the men’s and women’s prisons remain chronically overcrowded based on the Inspector of Prisons standards, and regularly overcrowded based on the prison service’s own standards.”

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Jesuit Centre criticises plan for 'doubling up' and expansion in new Cork Prison

prison 250Jesuit Centre strongly criticises plan for 'doubling up' in new Cork Prison, describing the decision as a retrograde step and in breach of international best practice

Immediate Release: 12h00 16 January 2014

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice has expressed dismay that the Minister for Justice will today sign the building contract for a new prison in Cork which is based on double occupancy of cells, saying this is a retrograde step and in breach of international best practice.

The Jesuit Centre challenges the Minister's previous assertions that the new prison will provide "adequate and suitable accommodation for all prisoners". The Centre points out that a failure to provide single cell accommodation in the new prison will be contrary to Article 18.5 of the European Prison Rules, drawn up by the Council of Europe of which Ireland is a founder member State.

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