Working Notes: New Dáil, New Dawn?

Working Notes: New Dáil, New Dawn?

In a Statement issued prior to the General Election in February of this year, the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice noted that in public discussions in Ireland on how to address the economic crisis reference was frequently made, by politicians and commentators, to ‘the common good’, ‘solidarity’ and ‘sustainability’. The Statement said that while this was welcome, the reality was that the mere articulation of such values was in itself of little consequence, unless there was ‘a corresponding determination to take the decisions and measures necessary to give effect to these values’.

The Programme for Government of the new Fine Gael–Labour Party Government includes many references to values such as social solidarity and equality; indeed, at the outset, the Programme states that both parties in Government are ‘committed to forging a new Ireland that is built on fairness and equal citizenship’.

Posted in Economic Policy News

Continue Reading

Print Email

Creation of a just and sustainable model of economic development will require radical cultural change

NEWS RELEASE Friday, 29 October 2010

 

Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice

 

Creation of a just and sustainable model of economic development will require radical cultural change, says Jesuit theologian

The creation of a new economic paradigm, with a focus on sustainability and fairness, will require a radical turning away from prevailing values and culture, says Jesuit priest, Fr Gerry O’Hanlon SJ, theologian and staff member of the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice.

Posted in Economic Policy News

Continue Reading

Print Email

Working Notes: What Direction for Recovery?

Working Notes: Which Direction for Recovery?

 

This issue of Working Notes is devoted to three articles which explore different possibilities in the increasingly urgent search for a type of economic development that is balanced, sustainable and just.

In the second of two articles on the theme, ‘A New Economic Paradigm?’, Gerry O’Hanlon SJ turns to some of the practical proposals now being put forward in regard to the direction and shape of future economic development. He looks at the key proposals of a number of Irish reports and also, in some detail, at a report from the London-based NEF (New Economics Foundation). The title of the NEF report – The Great Transition – and the headings of its seven core themes (for example, ‘The Great Redistribution’; ‘The Great Localisation’; ‘The Great Reskilling’) reflect the type of radical changes which the NEF considers necessary to effectively regulate markets, reform financial systems, ensure environmental sustainability, and address inequalities within and between countries.

 

 

Posted in Economic Policy News

Continue Reading

Print Email

‘Reformed Catholicism’ could play a role in addressing economic crisis

News Release

Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice

 

Monday, 29 March 2010

‘Reformed Catholicism’ could play important role in cultural renewal needed to address economic crisis

A “reformed Catholicism”, acting alongside other strands of Christianity and other religious and humanist traditions, could play an important role in the cultural and political renewal that is essential to finding a more just and sustainable economic model, says Jesuit theologian, Fr Gerry O’Hanlon SJ.

Writing in the March 2010 issue of Working Notes, the journal of the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice, Fr O’Hanlon says that it is tempting to think that new regulations, laws and policies alone will be sufficient to deal with the current financial and economic crisis. However, he points out, the scale and depth of the crisis, along with the growing realisation that a path of neverending growth is simply not sustainable, highlight the need for more far-reaching change.

Posted in Economic Policy News

Continue Reading

Print Email

Gerry O'Hanlon in Tasc blog: Asking the Right Question

We are understandably concerned about economic recovery in Ireland these days. But given that ‘recovery’ might be taken to imply a return to a previously desirable state, perhaps we need to reframe the question that we ask. If we ask ‘how do we recover’, we are in danger, in our public discourse, of letting conventional indicators like a pick-up in retail sales, an increase in property values, a rise in consumer sentiment, even – the Holy Grail! – growth in GDP and GNP, become the sole normative criteria for what might too easily become a return to ‘business as usual’. That would be a pity. Given what we have learned about the serious flaws in our ‘business as usual’ model, it might be better to ask a different sort of question that might push us in a more radical direction – so, for example, ‘how do we create a new economic model that is sustainable’?
The predominantly neo-liberal, infinite-growth model of the recent past has let us down. It was shot through with an economism which meant that an obsession with economic growth trumped so many other human values. It was riddled with inequalities both within and between nations, in ways which made solidarity unsustainable. And its focus on consumption did serious damage to our planet, as well as failing to make us happier.

Posted in Economic Policy News

Continue Reading

Print Email